Fitness Trends for 2016

As the New Year approaches we tend to look back and review the past year and also plan ahead to the next one.
2015 saw The Studio develop extra-small classes, enabling clients to enjoy individual tuition within a group format. This makes it affordable, effective and sociable.
I undertook further training to enhance my skills as a fitness professional and soft tissue therapist. My specialist training with an experienced osteopath this year was in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of knee pain. A really useful area in which to have more knowledge. My soft tissue work training was in recognising and releasing the tightness which causes poor posture and gives back pain along with some new techniques to offer sport massage without pain.

So, what underlying trends can we expect to see in 2016? (ref ACSM)
1. Wearable Technology
Trackers, heart rate monitors etc… all helping increase activity levels by constant monitoring.
2. Body Weight Workouts
Taking fitness back to basics by using body weight instead of machines and free weights.
3. HIIT
High Intensity Interval Training used with many forms of fitness to improve performance and shorten the time spent exercising.
4. Strength Training
Both in the gym and in classes for general fitness as well as improved bone density.
5. Fitness Professionals with better training
Improved training leads to better results and more choice for the public in looking to improve their fitness.
6. Personal Training
Including group PT - extra small group exercise classes, perfect for affordable individual tuition
7. Functional Fitness
Fitness which helps activities of everyday life, essential for keeping active for longer.
8. Fitness for Older Adults
Older adults have specific requirements which are now recognised and will be better catered for.
9. Exercise for weight loss
Dieting alone cannot achieve sustainable weight loss and this trend backs the theory that exercise is an essential part of weight loss.
10. Yoga
Yoga has many forms and often includes ‘wellness’ which features lower down the list of fitness trends. I see these combined to offer an exercise based way to cope with the stress of today’s busy lifestyles.
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Risk v Benefit - Keeping your exercise programme safe


Risk v Benefit Keeping your exercise programme safe

 

There is much in the popular press about the benefits of exercise for both physical and mental health.  Many people are encouraged to take up exercise by their doctor or physiotherapist.  On the other hand, there are many articles about the risk of injury from exercise.  For example one study showed that over 60% of runners will pick up an injury in any one year, and another stated that 35% of women exercising on a regular basis will have a musculoskeletal injury.  

 

As a fitness professional and physical therapist I use a variety of techniques to ensure that my clients gain the benefit and do not suffer any injury:

 

I encourage clients to work at their own level, not keeping up or competing with each other.

I keep a close eye on the posture of each client as they exercise.  If there is a postural fault when a client walks in, they will probably keep that faulty position as they exercise.  This will be a habit that I am keen to discourage and correct with exercise.

When I spot a common postural imbalance within a group I will add exercises to help them correct it.  This could be drawing back rounded shoulders, lengthening the neck or stretching tight hamstrings to encourage better pelvic alignment.

At the beginning of each session I check how everyone is feeling and how long standing injuries are progressing.  I will include the best exercises to help each persons condition.  This could be reducing range of movement to encourage stabilization of a lax joint, work to strengthen a weak joint or stretches to help muscles tightened up by other sports such as running or cycling.

 
Using these methods I aim to help everyone to exercise and gain a benefit whilst not risking an injury.  Remember that your feedback is essential to ensuring a safe effective exercise programme so don’t keep quiet about any pain or discomfort as there is usually a way to manage it, and it is often a good indicator to the types of exercise you need.
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I have arthritis, should I exercise?

Some Facts about arthritis:
  • About 70% of people over the age of 65 will have some level of arthritis and 1 in 5 of the whole population.  This equates to around 10 million people in the UK.
  • A number of people will have no symptoms and be oblivious to the fact that they have arthritis, but most people with it will suffer some symptoms, such as pain and stiffness, on a daily basis.
  • The most common type of arthritis is Osteoarthritis, followed by Rheumatoid (especially in women) and Gout (especially in men).
  • There are actually over 100 different diseases that can cause the problems characterised as arthritis.
  • There is no cure for arthritis.
 
What is arthritis?
Arthritis affects the joints of the body.  At least two bones meet to form a joint, but some joints have three and wrists and ankles have more. Each joint in the body is constructed in a slightly different way.  Most of the main joints have cartilage covering the bone ends and the whole joint is enclosed in a sort of bag called the joint capsule.  This bag holds synovial fluid which effectively lubricates the joint.
Arthritis develops when the cartilage has become worn, torn, or has been removed, often due to trauma.
The synovial fluid within the joint capsule becomes thicker or ‘stickier’ as we age and as a result doesn’t coat the cartilage as well.  This results in increased wear to the cartilage and the bone ends which become roughened.  The joint can no longer slide smoothly and pain results.  This is typical in osteoarthritis of the knees, shoulders and hips.
With Rheumatoid arthritis joints become swollen as the body attacks its own tissues.  There are many other forms of arthritis, such as spondylitis which is when inflammation around the spine causes pain.

What causes arthritis?
Arthritis has a variety of causes, most of which are not fully understood.  For example:
  • Trauma to a joint earlier in life frequently makes arthritis more likely.  A car accident, sporting injury, trip or fall can all cause damage to a joint, weakening it and making it susceptible to arthritis, sometimes not manifested until later life.
  • Cartilage has a poor blood supply which means that when damaged by twisting or tearing is doesn’t heal very well.  As a result, it was common for cartilage to be removed following trauma, although nowadays this is less frequently performed and exercise is used to manage the situation.
  • Carrying excess weight puts more strain on the joints increasing the amount of wear and tear.
  • There is a clear genetic link which can increase the risk factor for Rheumatoid arthritis which can be activated by trauma.
 
Exercising with arthritis.
Arthritis causes joints to be stiff, painful and to have a reduced range of movement.  Exercise can improve these symptoms but it needs to take account of the arthritis. I work to create an environment and exercises within which the joints can be moved freely and without pain and you feel able to exercise within you own capabilities.  In addition, exercise can encourage good posture, which is essential in keeping the spine straight and reducing the risk of kyphosis – rounding of the neck shoulders as well as potentially slowing the progress of degeneration.
 
Key points to remember:
  • Loosening joints, using movement which is pain free, is essential to encourage and keep the maximum mobility.  For example, in ball and socket joints, simply rotating the limb within the joint capsule can have a beneficial effect, by encouraging the synovial fluid to coat the whole joint and become less ‘sticky’.
  • Specific muscle strengthening work to support the damaged joints will help reduce pain on a daily basis.  This is especially beneficial for the hips, shoulders, knees and spine.
  • Do not push through the pain, look for a different way to loosen or strengthen the painful area.
  • Avoid overstretching and putting joints into positions out of their normal range.  For example, knees are a hinge joint, designed to bend in a forward and backward motion with limited rotational range.  Sitting with legs crossed will stress the joint and in time can cause wear and then damage.
  • Note which activities cause pain and look to find other ways of doing them.  Exercise can be designed to help you strengthen your body enabling you to do regular activities with less pain.

Finally:
Arthritis can be debilitating and has no cure, but exercise is one of the recommended treatments - don’t let arthritis be a reason to stop exercising.

 
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Thai Boxing - Personal Training with a difference


Make a difference to yourself today.

Are you in the Warwick area and looking for a different way to get and stay in shape?

Personal training will not only help you achieve your goals but is also a great alternative to a regular gym work out and run on the treadmill!

Singkhao Muay Thai Instructor Macauley Coyle is a competitive Muay Thai Fighter and athlete.

The training he will provide is varied and is planned to suit your individual needs and goals, whether you want to work on technique, become healthier, lose weight, improve your fitness or just learn something new.

So whatever you are aiming for, Macauley can help you reach your goals and achieve them faster than you would on your own.

Personal training sessions vary from person to person, areas that you may cover in a session include padwork, technical work, cardio and plyometrics. All equipment is provided and all you need to bring is lose fitting clothing, suitable for working out in. Nutritional advice is also available on request.

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