Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - More common than you might think


 HAVE A LOOK AT THE NEW PELVIC FLOOR WORK - IT
AFFECTS MORE PEOPLE THAN YOU MIGHT THINK

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: What is it, why do you have it and how can you correct it?

To start with, new research in 2014 shows that 80% of women will have Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (PFD) at some point in their life and 30% will have stress incontinence.  Men are also affected by PFD, frequently as a result of prostrate problems, although this is talked about much less.

What is Pelvic Floor Dysfunction?
A dysfunctional muscle is one which will not contract nor release so it tends to be both tight and weak, and consequently, unable to function correctly.
The pelvic floor is the muscle group which forms the 'under carriage' of your trunk.  It supports your internal organs, includes the "bathroom" muscles and adds support to the sacro-iliac joint. So it is essential that it functions correctly.  If it is dysfunctional it will be tight, short and weak instead of being flexible, long and strong.

Symptoms of PFD may include:
Abdominal separation following pregnancy
Stress incontinence
Pelvic discomfort
Back and Sacro-Iliac joint pain

The contributors to PFD include:
Pregnancy
Crunches and sit ups
Poor posture
Wearing high heels
Sitting for too long 

What is the solution?
New research has identified that the pelvic floor will not work effectively in isolation, it will function up to 75% better through a specific mix of muscle group activation rather than with the traditional 'kegels' exercises (controlled lifting of the pelvic floor in isolation).
In addition, all exercises should be performed with the pelvis in a neutral position, not in the pelvic tilt position.
The specific mix of muscle group activation is to work the Glute (butt) muscles in conjunction with inner, and outer, thigh muscles.  This is the key combination for optimum pelvic floor engagement and improved support to the pelvis.

The best exercises are:
Squats with correct alignment to strengthen yet lengthen the pelvic floor
Shoulder bridge with a small ball between your knees
Curtsey or split squats
Clam type exercise using fast and slow twitch pelvic floor activation
Check with an exercise professional to ensure that your technique is correct as this is essential to gain any PF benefit.  The big benefit of this new approach is that by working this specific group of muscles, correctly, the pelvic floor will activate automatically.

Exercises to avoid
Any exercise with a pelvic tilt as this shortens the pelvic floor muscle, encouraging dysfunction.
Crunches or sit ups, which increase the downward pressure on the pelvic floor.
High impact exercise.
Pilates exercises such as 'the 100'

Would you like to know more?
Just contact Anne by phone or email to discuss your needs. The correct exercises and techniques are taught in 'I Move Freely' Pilates Classes at The Studio
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The New Pelvic Floor Work

PELVIC FLOOR DYSFUNCTION (PFD) - IT AFFECTS MORE PEOPLE THAN YOU MIGHT THINK

PFD what is it, do you have it and how can you correct it?
We now know that 80% of women will have Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (PFD) at some point in their life.
A dysfunctional muscle is one which will not contract nor release so it tends to be both tight and weak, and consequently, unable to function correctly.
The pelvic floor is the muscle which forms the 'under carriage' of your trunk so it is essential that it functions correctly for adequate core support.
If it is dysfunctional it will be tight , short and weak instead of being flexible, long and strong.

The symptoms of PFD may include:
Abdominal separation following pregnancy
Occasional stress incontinence
Pelvic discomfort
Back and Sacro-Iliac joint pain

The contributors to PFD include:
Pregnancy
Over doing sit ups
Poor posture
Wearing high heels
Sitting for too long 

What is the solution?
Exercise with the pelvis in a neutral position.
Ensure Sacro Iliac joint stability by strengthening surrounding muscle groups
Strengthen Glute (butt) muscles in conjunction with inner and outer thigh muscles
Squat with correct alignment to strengthen yet lengthen the pelvic floor

Exercises to avoid:
Any exercise with a pelvic tilt as this shortens the pelvic floor muscle encouraging dysfunction
Sit ups which increase the downward pressure on the pelvic floor
High impact exercise
Pilates exercises such as 'the 100'


Would you like to know more?
Just contact Anne by phone or email to discuss your needs.
The correct exercises and techniques are taught in 'I Move Freely' Pilates Classes at The Studio
For more specific advice book a one to one session or a place at one of our new 
"SELECT" classes.
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